New Hampshire Weavers Guild
SEPTEMBER 19, 2018

MORNING WORKSHOPS

 

UNDERSTANDING OVERSHOT, SESSION 1


Teacher: Jayne Flanagan

 

Even the newest weaver finds the possibilities of

patterning with only four shafts exciting. Then, after

success with published designs, there comes a desire for

true understanding, experimentation, and originality.

In Part 1, we'll analyze the overshot structure, as

written in both traditional and modern forms. We will

discuss its strengths and limitations, how to determine

materials and setts, drawdown conventions, weaving with

two shuttles, and basic treadling variations. The discussion

will also cover how to create your own designs and

drawdowns. The goal is to have all levels of students

understand the basics and/or explore more possibilities.

Homework between sessions includes weaving samples

for exchange and/or a project. Challenge yourself

according to your interests and abilities, for example;

understand and weave a project from a magazine or book,

try altering patterns and materials, copy a cherished

antique pattern, or perhaps even create an original pattern

or project.

 

Students please bring graph paper, pencil, eraser,

scissors, tape, note taking supplies and an idea for your

homework sample or project. Suitable for all levels.

 

Materials fee: $2.00 Session 1of 2

 

After childhood knitting and sewing, Jayne has been

handweaving and spinning since the early 1970s. Her

weaving includes everything from backstrap to drawloom,

with particular fondness for understanding structures,

interesting equipment, linen and "narrow wares". She is the

current treasurer of NHWG, a past president of NEWS, as

well as a member of several other guilds and study groups.

 

SEAMS GREAT!


Teacher: Sarah Fortin

 

Ever wonder how to get those perfect seam finishes for

your hand woven garments? Here is your chance to learn.

We will cover all seam finishes that may be appropriate for

your hand woven fabrics.

Bring your sewing machine, and all related equipment,

and at least 15 six inch squares of handwoven or

commercial fabric. We will practice seams and seam

finishes from clean finished to Hong Kong.

Suitable for all levels, especially beginners.


Materials Fee: $6.00

 

Sarah became enthralled with hand weaving as a

student of Clothing and Textiles at Washington State

University. After graduating and coming to the East Coast

in the early 70s, she continued to pursue weaving as a craft

while working as an Extension Educator.

Sarah continues to explore and expand in her art with

new techniques as she teaches and exhibits in the area and

around the country.

 

TWILL—THE VERSATILE WEAVE, SESSION 1


Teacher: Adele Harvey

 

In the September session we will discuss and learn

about twills. We will look at various examples of twills,

learn how to recognize them, draft them, and use them.

Adele plans to bring many representative samples.

In the October session we will continue our study by

exploring twills requiring more than four shafts. We will

also share the members' woven homework, samples and

drafts.

 

Please bring note taking materials: graph paper, pencil,

ruler, and eraser for drafting. The class is suitable for beginners.

 

Materials/Handout Fee: none    Session 1 of 2

 

Adele has been a weaver for more than 50 years. She

enjoys weaving household textiles and has woven

reproduction textiles for Canterbury Shaker Village, the

Concord Museum and Plimouth Plantation. She has been a

member of the Weavers Guild of Boston, Dallas

Handweavers, New Hampshire Weavers Guild, Complex

Weavers, and HGA.


WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS

WHAT DID YOU DO THIS SUMMER?


Moderator: Linda Lincoln

 

Just like kids who are back in school, we are back to

our regular weaving guilds and study groups—so, what did

you do on your summer vacation? Go to a conference?

Take a class? Weave something you've never tried before?

Had an AHHAH moment?

 

Bring something you accomplished and share with your

fellow weavers!

 

Past president and nearly always ready to volunteer,

Linda is anxious to learn from her fellow weavers. Over 40

years of weaving has left her knowing only that she has

much to learn, and the help, encouragement and friendship

of weavers has made her journey so much fun. She has two

looms that are rarely naked, and only need the occasional

"What if?" to send her off on another adventure.


AFTERNOON PROGRAM


NAVIGATING THE EXHIBIT ENTRY PROCESS


How do I enter an exhibit? What is the jury process?

What images are needed? What kind of information is

needed?

These are all questions that we ask ourselves as we

prepare to enter an exhibit. Using information from

various exhibits and a variety of jurors, Sarah will try to

answer these questions. Images, exhibit entry forms and

jury forms will be used to demonstrate the process.

We hope to encourage more New Hampshire Weavers'

Guild entries for NEWS and other exhibits.

 

About The Speaker

 

Sarah Fortin is a graduate of Washington State

University where she studied weaving, clothing and

textiles. She became a juried member of the League of

New Hampshire Craftsmen in 1985 and has won awards in

local and national exhibitions. Sarah currently travels

throughout the country teaching and entering juried

exhibits and so is familiar with the entry process. Sarah

has had articles published in Handwoven magazine. Her

current work includes oneofakind

clothing, wallart pieces featuring weaving in three dimensions,

double and triple weave structures, puckers, pleats, tucks

and gathers.



**********************************************************
OCTOBER 17, 2018


WEAVING WITH RAGS


Teacher: Linda Clutterbuck

 

This workshop will be a lecture/demonstration with

some hands on activities to acquaint participants with the

weaving of rag rugs. Participants will receive information

on how to prepare the loom, how to prepare the rags, and

how to weave with rags. Students should be comfortable

warping a two or four shaft loom and doing plain weave.

 

Materials fee: none            1 Session

 

Linda Clutterbuck has had an almost lifelong

Interest in weaving rag rugs as she grew up in a house with rag

rugs woven by her Finnish grandmother. Linda's other

fiber interests are knitting and hand spinning.

 

 

COLOR AND WEAVE EFFECT


Teacher: Beth Cederberg Guertin

 

Color and weave effect describes an infinite number of

patterns which can be created by repeating a small pattern

of light and dark colors in the warp and wefts using a basic

weave structure. The visual patterns formed do not

resemble the weave structure and cannot be predicted

without a color draft.

 

This workshop will explore the general characteristics

of color and weave effect by looking at samplers and

drafts and reviewing color drafting. A 50-page

learning packet will be available to each student containing notes,

drafts and project ideas.

 

Please bring graph paper, pencil, eraser, ruler and colored pencils.

Participants need to be able to do drawdowns/drafting by hand.

 

Materials fee: $5.00       1 Session

 

Beth Cederberg Guertin of Waltham, Massachusetts,

has been teaching both rigid heddle and multishaft

weaving for more than thirty-five years. She enjoys

designing projects to use up small amounts of yarns.

 

TWILL–THE VERSATILE WEAVE, SESSION 2


Teacher: Adele Harvey

 

In this second session, we will continue our study by

exploring twills requiring more than four shafts. We will

also share the members' woven homework, samples and

drafts. Samples of multi-harness twills will be shown.

 

Students please bring note taking materials, graph paper,

pencil, ruler, and an eraser to do drafting. In addition,

bring your woven twill samples or drafts.

 

Materials fee: None     Session 2 of 2


Adele has been a weaver for more than 50 years. She

enjoys weaving household textiles and has woven

reproduction textiles for Canterbury Shaker Village, the

Concord Museum and Plimoth Plantation.

She has been a member of the Weavers Guild of

Boston, Dallas Handweavers, New Hampshire Weavers

Guild, as well as Complex Weavers, and HGA.


WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS

 

START YOUR CREATIVE SPARK


Moderator: Marjie Thompson

 

Everyone hits the "I don’t know what to weave" wall

and a spark is needed to get going again. We'll talk about

what can get new ideas flowing and we'll start with the

Fuller Ripley manuscript, the Guild subject for the NEWS

Guild show. We will learn how to read the drafts and what

to do with those on 24 shafts when you only have four or

eight shafts. Sparks will fly and maybe, just maybe, your

own creativity will flourish.

 

Marjie, jack-of-all-trades and constant inventor of

classes, likes to weave "old stuff" and that now extends to

the not-so-old but still antique mid-20th century weaving.


AFTERNOON PROGRAM


THE RISE AND FALL OF THE FEMALE BREAST:

THE AESTHETICS OF THE BOSOM IN HISTORY

 

From the earliest cave paintings, through the middle

ages, into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, nature

has never managed to place "breasts" where they are

required to be by that fascist dictator, Fashion. Through

the use of restrictive garments such as corsets, and other

contrivances, breasts have been manipulated into the

current preferred aesthetic in every age. Wars, religion,

women's suffrage, and in particular, cinema have played

important roles in the long history of this fascinating subject.

 

About the Speaker

 

Edward Maeder is a graduate of the

University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the

Courtauld Institute of Art, University of

London. A renowned dress historian, he has

held curatorial positions at the Fashion

Institute of Technology, New York, and the

Los Angeles County Museum of Art. He was

the Director of Exhibitions and the Curator of

Textiles at Historic Deerfield and the founding

director of the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto.

He is on the board of The National Museum of

the American Coverlet, Bedford, PA.


This special speaker is funded by the

bequest given in the memory of Harriet

Mitiguy.


***********************************************************

NOVEMBER 28, 2018

UNDERSTANDING OVERSHOT, SESSION 2

 

Teacher: Jayne Flanagan

 

In Part 2, we will do a sample exchange/show and tell,

talking about our overshot experience with questions and

answers. We'll also share more ideas including additional

treadling variations (woven as), and turning the overshot

draft.

 

Materials fee: None Session 2 of 2

 

After childhood knitting and sewing, Jayne has been

handweaving and spinning since the early 1970s. Her

weaving includes everything from backstrap to drawloom,

with particular fondness for understanding structures,

interesting equipment, linen and "narrow wares". She is

the current treasurer of NHWG, a past president of NEWS,

as well as a member of several other guilds and study

groups.

 

 

INKLING SANTAS & ELVES

 

Teacher: Connie Gray

 

Weave a narrow strip on a simple loom, and sew it

magically into a clever Santa "tetrahedron" or an impish

elf! Experience the whole process in this workshop or

come with your own two-inch by six-inch

strip of fabric or ribbon, and learn to assemble your

"Inkling", complete with soft-sculptured

face features in this hands-on workshop.

 

These charming little stuffed imps make delightful dolls,

or ornaments, or collectibles for the child in us all!

 

Bring fabric strips two-inch by six-inch

(inkle or commercial), basic hand sewing supplies

such as needle, thread, scissors, etc. The instructor will

supply pattern and instructions, polyfil stuffing, stockings

for face, and yarn thrums for hair.

 

Materials fee: $2.00     1 Session

 

Having learned many crafts "at my mother's knee,"

Connie has enjoyed many fiber arts/crafts most of her life.

Currently her favorites are teaching, weaving on little and

big looms, and Polymer Clay.

Also, she enjoys taking workshops and may be known

as a "workshop junkie!"

 

SEWING WITH HANDWOVENS, OR, THE FEAR OF

CUTTING

 

Teacher: Sally Eyring

 

Are you tired of weaving scarves and linens and would

love to weave for clothes, but have a fear of cutting

precious handwoven cloth? Do you think weaving cloth to

sew is the same as weaving for a scarf? (Hint, there are

several differences!) If so, then this lecture is for you.

Sally will help you get over your fear of cutting

handwoven cloth by explaining how sewing with it is

different than sewing commercial cloth. The discussion

will include designing and making your own patterns,

matching the cloth weight to a pattern, fitting patterns to

your body, seam finishing techniques, linings that work

with your cloth, and tips relevant to handwoven cloth. This

is not a "how to" sewing class and a fundamental

knowledge of sewing is assumed.

 

Because sewing is a voluminous topic that can be

studied for years no matter what cloth you use, the

emphasis will be on a planning approach for weavers, and

resources that you can study further after class.

 

Materials fee: $7.00      1 Session

 

Sally Eyring has been weaving, sewing, and building

tools since childhood. Her complete biography is listed

under her November afternoon program.

 

WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS

 

"HOW DO I...?"

 

Moderator: Maureen Hoffman

 

"How do I read this draft, find this yarn, change this

pattern, hem this item…?"

 

Every weaver has questions that arise that need an

answer. No one has all the answers but the collective

wisdom of a group of weavers has the potential to answer a

lot of queries in a WHW session. Bring your weaving

problems and the group may just surprise you. Bring any

thorny problem needing inspiration.

 

Learning to weave started in the1980s for Maureen who

loves to weave all kinds of things as long as they are

colorful. She proudly brings many thorny weaving

problems to her various weaving groups and therefore is a

master at finding the answer to questions. Maureen is

currently the Webmaster for the NHWG website.


AFTERNOON PROGRAM

 

THE WORLD ISNT FLAT! 3D LOOM WEAVING

 

The world isn't flat, so why should you think of your

weaving as always being flat? You have spent years

learning the rules of two-dimensional weaving; now learn

how to break those rules to weave 3D sculptural forms.

 

Basket weavers have been weaving three dimensional

objects since antiquity, but Sally will explain her

techniques for weaving specific shapes on a loom. Her

techniques actually allow the shape to be woven in, and do

not depend on differential shrinkage or sewing for their

shape. For example, in one weaving the resulting fabric

had a selvage of 54 inches on one edge and 11 inches on

the other! Although she sometimes uses nontraditional

materials such as copper wire for more artistic pieces, this

weaving can be done with standard cotton, linen, or wool

yarn.

 

Sally's work can be seen at: www.sallyeyring.com/

 

About the Speaker

 

Sally Eyring has been weaving, sewing, and building

tools since childhood. She earned a BA in Mathematics

Education from Arizona State University and an MFA

from the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University. Her

MFA graduate project described the immigration

experience through woven sculptural headdresses, using a

unique 3D weaving method that she invented. Her work

has been featured in the Complex Weavers Journal,

Handwoven, and Shuttle, Spindle & Dyepot.

In addition to weaving, Sally both renovates and builds

looms, and does glass casting.