New Hampshire Weavers Guild

Fall 2019 Morning and Afternoon Programs


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Morning Workshops and Weavers Helping Weavers


Workshops are open to NHWG Members only, so Join us!

Please print out the Workshop REGISTRATION form below

and mail with your check as soon as possible.

Some classes fill quickly!


September 18, 2019


DOUBLE WEAVE ON MORE THAN FOUR SHAFTS


Teacher: Susan Rockwell


This lecture/demo class will explore the aspects of double weave that can be created on more than four shafts. More shafts mean more possible combinations of double weave and other structures and a greater use of color. We will also cover drafting for multiple shaft double weave. Students should be familiar with the basics of double weave and drafting, however it isn’t necessary to have taken the first session in March.

Handout Fee $2.00    1 session


Susan is active in the Vermont Weavers Guild and Past President of the New England Weavers Seminar (a conference for all New England guilds). Susan has been teaching weaving classes for over 30 years at weaving guilds, regional weaving conferences and craft schools. She has exhibited and won numerous awards for her weaving. Susan has juried weaving exhibits and organized and completed a 250hour course for weaving instructors.


BASIC DRAFTING: THREAD BY THREAD


Teacher: Jayne Flanagan


Of the four parts of a draft, the drawdown is the most often omitted. It has been written that following a weaving recipe without seeing a drawdown is like being an illiterate monk copying an illuminated manuscript. Good looking squiggles, but what do they mean? Do you fully understand all the symbols and repeat notations of any draft? It doesn't take long to check a recipe by "weaving" it on paper first. Drawdowns show structure, color interaction, float lengths, proportions and possible errors in the threading, tie-up and treadling. In this class, become aware of the many conventions of drafting and practice today's most commonly published forms. Suitable for all levels. Bring paper scissors, tape, graph paper, pencils, colored pencils, ruler and a big eraser!

Handout $2     1 session


Jayne is the Guild's treasurer and has taught many classes for NHWG and other local guilds. She started weaving and spinning in the early 1970s, and has recently taken over the leadership of the Complex Weavers "Structures" Study Group.


TEXTILE ANALYSIS: A START ON DECIPHERING ONE OF WEAVING'S MYSTERIES


Teacher: Marjie Thompson


Many weavers like to read mystery stories. If you are one of those who enjoys a good mystery, this class is for you! We will start with clues–color and fiber type(s)–and move to the how-done-it. Since we live in northern New England, the early clues will be obtained from antique textiles before we move on to contemporary wovens from fabric stores. Hopefully, the clues will lead us to the right weave-able answers. Please bring graph paper (of a size you can see), pencils, T-pins, and a pick glass/linen tester if you have one. "Cheater" glasses also may help (if you don't know what is meant, you don't need them–yet.)

No handout fee          1 session


Marjie Thompson enjoys reading mystery stories and textile analysis. Her current analysis challenges are the trims used in Model T Fords as well as any and every antique textile that comes her way.


WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS

To be announced.  


October 16, 2019

 

READY SETT GO: WARP SETT MADE SIMPLE

 

Teacher: Cameron Taylor-Brown

 

Many hand weavers guess at sett by winding yarn around a ruler. There is another way to determine sett simply and accurately. For many years, the textile industry used the Ashenhurst Formula, which provides easy mathematical calculations for spun yarns that account for fiber, yarn type, weave and end use. In a hands-on, practical exploration, the secrets of the Ashenhurst Formula will be revealed. We'll move between yarn samples and paper and pencil computations, focusing only on simple calculations that are of immediate use to hand weavers. This hands-on workshop is available to students of all skill levels.  Students to bring pencil, calculator with a square root button, clear tape, a ruler and one piece of stiff cardboard,  approximately two inches high by eight inches wide.  The Instructor will provide notebook, worksheets and yarn.

Materials/Handout Fee: $5    1 session 


Cameron Taylor-Brown has immersed herself in the worlds of fiber, education and commerce since the 1970s.  She studied fiber art at the University of California, Berkeley with artist Ed Rossbach and textile design at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science.  (For more see Cameron's full bio after her afternoon presentation.) 


BLOCK THEORY: CREATING PATTERNS 


Teacher: Jayne Flanagan 


Using drawdown skills introduced in Basic Drafting, we will now study and practice the theory of building patterns with blocks. We will also reverse the process, analyzing patterns to define their blocks. Symmetry operations can be applied for even more design options.  The sky is the limit when playing with blocks on paper, but telescoping and digitizing a huge pattern will bring it back down to earth to fit the limitations of our looms. (Don’t forget that any pattern can be woven with pickup!) Suitable for students comfortable with drafting thread by thread drawdowns.  Bring paper scissors, tape, graph paper, pencils, colored pencils, ruler and a big eraser!

Handout $2     1 session 


Jayne is the Guild's treasurer and has taught many classes for NHWG and other local guilds. She started weaving and spinning in the early 1970s, and has recently taken over the leadership of the Complex Weavers  "Structures" Study Group. 

SPANISH LACE AND BROOKS BOUQUET 


Teacher: Sherry Cochran 


Spanish Lace and Brooks Bouquet are two laces that are easy to use as hems, borders, or over-all affects. They look great in all kinds of fibers. This class will show you how to make these hand manipulated laces and help you see their possibilities. It is a hands-on class and a sample loom will be provided. Students should bring a large yarn needle, small stick shuttle, scissors, note paper, graph paper, colored pencils and masking tape. Warp and weft will be provided. This class is suitable for all weaving skill levels! 

Materials fee $5          1 session 


Sherry Cochran recently earned her Apprentice rating through the New Hampshire Weavers Guild. She lives on a small farm where she weaves, spins, knits and has numerous other fiber interests. She raises a flock of Finnsheep and a herd of horses. Sherry's grandmother taught her to crochet when she was eight and she found out a couple of years ago that her grandfather was a weaver at a mill in Maine. She continues to study structure and the technical aspects of all things woven.


WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS 


A YEAR OF LEARNING: THREE CLASSES, THREE  INSTRUCTORS, THREE VENUES 


Moderator: Nancy Mulqueen 


After a short travelogue of the three classes I took in 2018 we'll open up the discussion to the pros and cons of taking a class. What do you learn about weaving and yourself? Please bring your stories of classes taken and lessons learned. Any samples from those classes are most welcome.    

NOVEMBER 20, 2019 


AN OVERVIEW AND EXPLORATION OF TABLET WEAVING


Teacher: Mary Ann Sanborn 


This class will explore the basic characteristics and tenets of tablet weaving, look briefly at its history and uses, discuss simple looms and tools, and review warping techniques and drafting conventions. We will look at several tablet weaving variations such as threaded-in designs, diagonals simple and complex, double-faced tablet weaving, and warp manipulations. There will be several looms available for experimentation. No prior experience needed. Come explore tablet weaving!  Students should bring materials for taking notes. There will be a handout with drafts used for the class and Tablet Weaving resources: books, websites, videos, suppliers, teachers, etc. 

Materials fee: $1         1 session 


Mary Ann enjoys all things weaving. She reads textile fiction and nonfiction; served on Guild, NEWS, and HGA  Boards; worked as Master Weaver at Canterbury Shaker Village, and taught at the NHWG, at other New England  guilds, and at NEWS. She loves drafting, playing on the loom, exploring weave structures, and tablet weaving. 


DANISH MEDALLION AND LENO Teacher: Sherry Cochran 


Danish Medallion and Leno are two more of the hand manipulated laces that we will explore. They can be used as accents, borders, and over-all texture. Learn how to make these laces and explore some of their uses! This class is hands-on and a sample loom will be provided. Warp and weft will also be provided. Students should bring a large yarn needle, small stick shuttle, scissors, note paper, graph paper, colored pencils and masking tape. This class is suitable for all skill levels. 

Materials fee $5          1 session 


Sherry Cochran recently earned her Apprentice rating through the New Hampshire Weavers Guild. She lives on a small farm where she weaves, spins, knits and has numerous other fiber interests. She raises a flock of Finnsheep and a herd of horses. Sherry's grandmother taught her to crochet when she was eight and she found out a couple of years ago that her grandfather was a weaver at a mill in Maine. She continues to study structure and the technical aspects of all things woven. 


WHEN BLOCKS MEET STRUCTURES 


Teacher: Jayne Flanagan 


Each weave structure has its own unique way to turn itself "on" and "off" (positive vs. negative) to make blocks of pattern; a change in color order, 3/1 twill becoming 1/3  twill, a pattern yarn moving from the face to the back of a  ground cloth, lacey floats changing direction or  disappearing altogether, and even combining structures.  Each structure also has unique requirements related to its ground weave, how blocks can be repeated (or not), combined with other blocks (or not), and the number of shafts needed per block. Students will translate block patterns into thread-by-thread plans for at least two structures to understand the connections between profile and thread-by-thread drafts. This class is suitable for students comfortable with drafting; knowledge of  common structures would also be helpful.  Bring paper scissors, tape, graph paper, pencils, colored pencils, ruler and a big eraser!

Handout $2     1 session

 

Jayne is the Guild's treasurer and has taught many classes for NHWG and other local guilds. She started weaving and spinning in the early 1970s, and has recently taken over the leadership of the Complex Weavers "Structures" Study Group. 


WEAVERS HELPING WEAVERS


WHAT IN THE HECK DOES IT MEAN?

 

Moderator: Marjie Thompson 


We have all faced a draft that makes no sense, either in the words used or the notation.  Bring your "problem drafts" and we will try to decipher them after a brief introduction of old terms, weaving conventions (understanding  why drafts in Davison's "green book" weave  upside down for most 21st century looms), and drafting styles.  


Marjie Thompson, past Guild President, appears to still be stuck in the 18th- and 19th-centuries as far as weaving is concerned.   


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Afternoon Programs

Afternoon programs start at approximately 1:30pm and

are open to members of the public at no charge.


September 18, 2019


WEAVING AS ART VERSUS CRAFT; STRADDLING THE DIVIDE


Presented by Molly McLaughlin


Fine craft. Fine art. Fiber art. Where do your weavings fall? Molly McLaughlin's talk will briefly cover the path of fiber in the West, as it expanded beyond the boundaries of craft and established itself as a valid medium in the fine art world. Using this history to give context, Molly will discuss her personal experiences in showing her work in the worlds of craft, fiber, and fine art, describing the challenges inherent in moving from craft venues to fine art venues and what she has learned along the way.

About the Speaker: Molly McLaughlin is a fiber artist who lives on the New Hampshire seacoast. Her weaving focuses on creating gallery pieces that reflect the dynamic color interplay and geometric forms found in nature. Her work has won awards in both fiber shows and fine art shows.


October 16, 2019


WARP AND WEFT: A CONVERSATION IN COLOR


Presented by Cameron Taylor-Brown


Weaving is a conversation between warp and weft–both parties have something to say, and we want the conversation to remain friendly! This presentation will look at ways to successfully mix warp and weft colors. We'll discuss the elements of color, how to select harmonious warp and weft, and how weave structure can influence the conversation. Each participant will then do a quick hands-on exploration with a "warp" wrapped around a piece of cardboard.

Note: Everyone should bring along a large eye tapestry needle, small scissors, and a piece of stiff cardboard about two inches high by eight inches wide, prewrapped with yarn(s) to represent their warp. Cameron will provide the weft yarn at no charge–you won't be using much and she'll have two suitcases full of choices. This quick exercise will be done during the lecture.

About the Speaker: Cameron Taylor-Brown has immersed herself in the worlds of fiber, education and commerce since the 1970s. She studied fiber art at the University of California, Berkeley, with artist Ed Rossbach and textile design at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science. She worked in New York City as a stylist of upholstery and home furnishing fabrics, taught textile design at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science and worked as an exhibition curator. Since 1985, Cameron has lived in Los Angeles where she maintains a studio and is active in several arts organizations. She was a founding board member of the Textile Group of Los Angeles and a past President of California Fibers and Designing Weavers. She recently founded ARTSgarage, a new textile resource center in Los Angeles. She was a founder of ACCESS Community Arts & Education, a consulting partnership that worked with classroom teachers and artists to make direct connections between the arts, curriculum, educational content standards and community arts experiences. Her work is widely exhibited and has been featured in American Craft; Common Thread; Handwoven; Fiber Art Now; and Shuttle, Spindle and Dyepot. She teaches workshops at schools, guilds, museums and conferences throughout the United States and at ARTSgarage in Los Angeles.


November 20, 2019

TEXTILE TRADITIONS AT CANTERBURY SHAKER VILLAGE: 1792–1992


Presented by Mary Ann Sanborn


The history of the Canterbury Shakers, a unique utopian society, is intricately tied to textiles. Whether produced by hand or in Shaker mills, yarn, cloth, and specialized products were fabricated to meet the needs of the community and for sale to the world's people. Canterbury Shakers were involved in textiles from the time they were gathered into community in 1792 until the final days in 1992. The Shakers raised sheep and grew linen, designed and produced textile tools and spinning wheels, and created textiles remarkable for beauty and practicality. Yarn and yardage by hand and machine, dyes and dyeing, Shaker rag rugs, Dorothy Cloaks, Shaker Sweaters, knit and crochet goods, sales trips, patents and trademarks, all are part of the textile history of the Canterbury Shakers. Mary Ann will have examples for viewing and asks if people would like to bring any Shaker textiles or textile tools or reproductions from their own collections that could be included.

About the Speaker: Mary Ann Sanborn worked as Master Weaver at Canterbury Shaker Village and is currently the HGA Program Co-Chair for the Certificate of Excellence program. She is a member of the New Hampshire Weavers Guild and has served on the NHWG, NEWS and HGA Boards. Mary Ann enjoys all things weaving including reading textile fiction and nonfiction, drafting, and experimenting with weave structures and tablet weaving. She has presented programs on weaving history and literature and has taught classes in weaving and tablet weaving and describes herself as a "flat weaver".